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Translation Review

Translation Review introduces its new website!

Translation Review has been a part of the academic translation community for over 30 years, and while our issues have been available online to our subscribers for some time, we are now happy to welcome you to our new website!

On this site, we are hoping to discover new ways to engage in a dialogue with readers, translators, and scholars.

On our Home page, we will keep you updated with weekly blog posts introducing new and upcoming issues, as well as selections from current and past articles. The Issues page will take you to the website of our publisher Routledge, where the entire catalogue of Translation Review is available in pdf form.

Under the Selected Content tab, you can find free downloads of noteworthy articles, reviews, and interviews from past issues of Translation Review. In the ABR section, you will find pdf-downloads of the Annotated Books Received, a yearly supplement to Translation Review giving readers an overview of translated books published in the United States each year.

Lastly, on the Community page, we have compiled a list of online translation journals and academic translation programs that might be of interest to our readers!


TR 94 is now available online and in hardcopy

In TR 94 we have a fascinating conversation between Ilan Stavans and Diana de Armas Wilson on Translating Don Quixote; an insightful essay by John DuVal on the importance of a single word in the essay titled "Mar"; Dennis Washburn's article on his important retranslation of the Japanese classic, The Tale of Genji; followed by the companion pieces written by Diane Rayor on translating newly discovered fragments written by Sappho into English and Abigail DeHart on translating Sappho into Hindi; an analysis of the contents of journals dedicated to translation studies written by Linxin Liang and Mingwu Xu; Adriana DiBiase's essay on the strategies used to protect multilingualism—specifically dialects—in the English translation of Il Giorno Prima della Felicità; and Emron Esplin's on tracking down the real translator of Nathanial Hawthorne's "Mr. Higginbotham's Catastrophe." In addition, we have four excellent reviews of recent works in translation: Kjell Askildsen's Selected Stories translated by Sean Kinsella and Jon Fosse's Melancholy II translated by Eric Dickens, both reviewed by Nadia Christiensen; Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis's Stories translated by Rhett McNeil, reviewed by Clifford E. Landers; Patrick Modiano's Suspended Sentences: Three Novellas translated by Mark Polizzotti, reviewed by Karen McPherson; and Gregary Racz's review of A Companion to Translation Studies, edited by Sandra Bermann and Catherine Porter.


From our current issue: "A Bibliometric Analysis of International Translation Studies"

Liang, Linxin, and Mingwu Xu. "A Bibliometric Analysis of International Translation Studies: Based on Relevant Data (2009–2013)." Translation Review 94.1 (2016): 52–64.

Translation studies is a young and fast-growing academic discipline—every year new and established departments at universities welcome an ever-growing number of students seeking to study translation. As the field expands and becomes more diverse, the number of academic journals focused on translation and interpretation continues to rise. For this article, Linxin Liang and Mingwu Xu—both scholars affiliated with the School of Foreign Languages at Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST)—conducted a quantitative analysis of eight of these journals, considering aspects such as impact factors, popular research topics, frequent contributors, and keywords to identify trends and patterns. Their analysis spans the years from 2009 to 2013 and "reveals development trends, research foci, and fronts of Translation Studies in a recent five-year period, and at the same time provides some references for translation researchers, translators, and others to seek potential collaborators, in the hope of paving the way for better development of Translation Studies" (52).

The journals analyzed in the article are:

Babel
Babel

Babel is an academic journal published for the Fédération Internationale des Traducteurs (FIT) aimed at an audience of translators, interpreters and terminologists.

The Interpreter and Translator Trainer
The Interpreter and Translator Trainer

The Interpreter and Translator Trainer "is a peer-reviewed international journal dedicated to research in the education and training of professional translators and interpreters, and of those working in other forms of interlingual and intercultural mediation and communication." It has been published twice a year since 2007 and is currently published by Routledge.

Interpreting
Interpreting

Interpreting – International Journal of Research and Practice in Interpreting is published by the Amsterdam-based John Benjamins and features articles concerned with the practice and training of interpreting.

LANS – TTS
LANS - TTS

Linguistica Antverpiensia, New Series – Themes in Translation Studies (LANS – TTS) is an open-access journal published at the Department of Translators and Interpreters at Antwerp University.

Target
Target

Target – International Journal of Translation Studies is a translation journal with "research on the theory, history, culture and sociology of translation and on the description and pedagogy that underpin and interact with these foci."

Translation and Interpreting Studies
Translation and Interpreting Studies

Translation and Interpreting Studies is the official journal of the American Translation and Interpreting Studies Association (ATISA) and is published twice a year.

Translation Studies
Translation Studies

Translation Studies "explores promising lines of work within the discipline of Translation Studies, placing a special emphasis on existing connections with neighbouring disciplines and the creation of new links." It has been published twice a year since 2008 and is currently published by Routledge.

The Translator
The Translator

The Translator "is a peer-reviewed international journal that publishes original and innovative research on a variety of issues related to translation and interpreting as acts of intercultural communication." It is currently published three times a year by Routledge.


Translation Review at ALTA

The 39th annual conference of the American Literary Translators Association is about to start in Oakland, CA, and Translation Review will be represented at the event. During last year's ALTA conference, we noticed a lot of member interest in Translation Review regarding its current publication status, continued availability to ALTA members, and submissions policies.

As a result, this year we will be holding a brief forum, during which TR staff will outline some of our current projects and editorial policies and be available to answer any questions our readers may have. The event will take place on Saturday, October 8, from 3:15 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. in the Foyer area during the afternoon beverage break sponsored by TR.

TR will also have a table in the book exhibit room and we will have several staff members attending the conference, including Shelby Vincent, managing editor; Gary Racz, book review editor; and Jonathan Becker, TR blog editor. If you have any questions or comments, please approach any of us when you see us during the breaks.


Translation Review is a forum for the discussion of the art, practice and theory of literary translation.

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Latest Issue of Translation Review

Translation Review
Volume 94
May 2016